Latest Tweets:

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kihaku-gato:

st-jimmy-im-a-son-of-a-gun:

THIS IS VERY VERY IMPORTANT
DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT TYPE OF FLOWERS THESE ARE? THEY’RE THE ONES I DREW FOR MUM AND I CAN’T FIND WHAT THEY ARE
IT’S VERY VERY VERY IMPORTANT TO ME
???

Looks like some species of Bladder Campion (genus being Silene). Sadly in my case I can’t narrow it any further than that since there are a couple of different Bladder Campions that look similar. Can anyone narrow these down to species?

kihaku-gato:

st-jimmy-im-a-son-of-a-gun:

THIS IS VERY VERY IMPORTANT

DOES ANYONE KNOW WHAT TYPE OF FLOWERS THESE ARE? THEY’RE THE ONES I DREW FOR MUM AND I CAN’T FIND WHAT THEY ARE

IT’S VERY VERY VERY IMPORTANT TO ME

???

Looks like some species of Bladder Campion (genus being Silene). Sadly in my case I can’t narrow it any further than that since there are a couple of different Bladder Campions that look similar. Can anyone narrow these down to species?

libutron:

Grove squill | ©Nikola Rahmé
Scilla vindobonensis (Asparagales - Asparagaceae), from Budapest, Hungary.

libutron:

Grove squill | ©Nikola Rahmé

Scilla vindobonensis (Asparagales - Asparagaceae), from Budapest, Hungary.

(via omgplants)

(Source: flowersonly, via flowerfood)

flowerfood:

ileftmyheartindixie:

Found this today while looking for the halter my horse mysteriously managed to slip

When I lived in Chicago, I would go searching for deer antlers in the forest preserves in late winter. Antlers are highly valued in Asian traditional medicine because of their medicinal and restorative properties (remember the thing about Ray Lewis using deer antler spray on his torn bicep?). However, forest animals often get to the antlers first because, for them, that’s some good eatin’.

flowerfood:

ileftmyheartindixie:

Found this today while looking for the halter my horse mysteriously managed to slip

When I lived in Chicago, I would go searching for deer antlers in the forest preserves in late winter. Antlers are highly valued in Asian traditional medicine because of their medicinal and restorative properties (remember the thing about Ray Lewis using deer antler spray on his torn bicep?). However, forest animals often get to the antlers first because, for them, that’s some good eatin’.

(Source: wayfaringblonde)

flora-file:

Psoralea fleta (by anniesannuals)

flora-file:

Psoralea fleta (by anniesannuals)

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flora-file:

lewisia (by flora-file)

flora-file:

lewisia (by flora-file)

likeafieldmouse:

Monotropa uniflora

"Also known as the ghost plantIndian pipe, or corpse plant. 

Unlike most plants, it is white and does not contain chlorophyll. Instead of generating energy from sunlight, it is parasitic, more specifically a myco-heterotroph. Its hosts are certain fungi that are mycorrhizal with trees, meaning it ultimately gets its energy from photosynthetic trees. Since it is not dependent on sunlight to grow, it can grow in very dark environments as in the understory of dense forest. It is often associated with beech trees. 

The complex relationship that allows this plant to grow also makes propagation difficult.

The plant is sometimes completely white but commonly has black flecks and a pale pink coloration. Rare variants may have a deep red color.”

(via brilliantbotany)

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hortushorrei:

Corte Eremo violets, a gift from Claudio Baldazzi.
A little patch in the gravel by the door to the bathroom. Last year only leaves - this year violets!

hortushorrei:

Corte Eremo violets, a gift from Claudio Baldazzi.

A little patch in the gravel by the door to the bathroom. Last year only leaves - this year violets!

(via thehopefulbotanymajor)