Latest Tweets:

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*45
realmofthesenses:

Karlie Kloss by Mario Testino, Vogue, September 2014

realmofthesenses:

Karlie Kloss by Mario Testino, Vogue, September 2014

(via mamisgarden)

*61
nemfrog:

Boojum tree. Natural History Magazine. 1951.

nemfrog:

Boojum tree. Natural History Magazine. 1951.

(via flora-file)

*10

kihaku-gato:

lilkittay:

The castor bean plant in all its spiky glory.

I planted it late, from a small, rootbound cup. Alas, the short growing season did not allow it to become massive and glorious.

If I get the opportunity to grow these plants again, they will get their own planters with premium soil and lots of love.

It would also be nice if the neighbor kids didn’t destroy them next time.

Maybe you’ll get lucky and your plant will set seed in time before the first frost so you can do it again!

*24

(Source: flowersonly, via flowerfood)

libutron:

Blue-eyed Moraea - A beauty in the verge of extinction in wild
Moraea aristata (Asparagales - Iridaceae) is a beautiful South African plant with white blooms marked with light to deep iridescent blue eyes or nectar guides. Although critically endangered in the wild, it is easily cultivated.
Endemic to clay slopes and flats of the northeastern Cape Peninsula, Moraea aristata occurs in remnant Peninsula Shale Renosterveld vegetation. The species is currently limited to a single subpopulation near the Liesbeek River in the suburb of Observatory. Despite its location within a protected area, it is on the verge of extinction there, as the limited number of individuals and low genetic diversity, poor seed production and disturbed site renders the subpopulation non-viable.
Moraea aristata is pollinated by monkey beetles (Hopliini: Scarabaeidae). The beetles are attracted to the striking blue nectar guides located near the base of the three broad outer tepals. The beetles feed on the nectar and pollen, and in so doing, pollen is deposited onto their heads and backs. When the beetles leave the flowers they brush against the stigmas and pollination takes place when they visit other flowers. The seeds are locally dispersed from the ripe capsules by the shaking action of wind.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Tiggrx | Locality: Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa (2011)

libutron:

Blue-eyed Moraea - A beauty in the verge of extinction in wild

Moraea aristata (Asparagales - Iridaceae) is a beautiful South African plant with white blooms marked with light to deep iridescent blue eyes or nectar guides. Although critically endangered in the wild, it is easily cultivated.

Endemic to clay slopes and flats of the northeastern Cape Peninsula, Moraea aristata occurs in remnant Peninsula Shale Renosterveld vegetation. The species is currently limited to a single subpopulation near the Liesbeek River in the suburb of Observatory. Despite its location within a protected area, it is on the verge of extinction there, as the limited number of individuals and low genetic diversity, poor seed production and disturbed site renders the subpopulation non-viable.

Moraea aristata is pollinated by monkey beetles (Hopliini: Scarabaeidae). The beetles are attracted to the striking blue nectar guides located near the base of the three broad outer tepals. The beetles feed on the nectar and pollen, and in so doing, pollen is deposited onto their heads and backs. When the beetles leave the flowers they brush against the stigmas and pollination takes place when they visit other flowers. The seeds are locally dispersed from the ripe capsules by the shaking action of wind.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Tiggrx | Locality: Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa (2011)

(via flowerfood)

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libutron:

Trigger Plant - Stylidium eriopodum
Enclosed in the Stylidiaceae Family, the scientific name of this plant, Stylidium eriopodum, is not resolved yet, and neither has an official common name, although some people call it boomerang plant by the peculiar shape of the flower. 
Stylidium species are generally known as Trigger Plants because their flowers have a touch-sensitive, fast-moving column that deposits pollen on, and picks it up from, pollinators (nectar-seeking solitary bees and bombyliid flies). Pollen is placed “explosively” on the insect by the motile column of fused staminate and pistillate tissues. 
This species grows in Southwestern Australia, where the plants are held above the ground on very fine roots, resembling beautiful mats over the ground.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Jean Hort | Locality: Australia (2012)

libutron:

Trigger Plant - Stylidium eriopodum

Enclosed in the Stylidiaceae Family, the scientific name of this plant, Stylidium eriopodum, is not resolved yet, and neither has an official common name, although some people call it boomerang plant by the peculiar shape of the flower. 

Stylidium species are generally known as Trigger Plants because their flowers have a touch-sensitive, fast-moving column that deposits pollen on, and picks it up from, pollinators (nectar-seeking solitary bees and bombyliid flies). Pollen is placed “explosively” on the insect by the motile column of fused staminate and pistillate tissues. 

This species grows in Southwestern Australia, where the plants are held above the ground on very fine roots, resembling beautiful mats over the ground.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Jean Hort | Locality: Australia (2012)

(via flowerfood)

*8
passion4plants:

passiflora vitifolia corona

passion4plants:

passiflora vitifolia corona

*93
passion4plants:

passiflora ‘byte’

passion4plants:

passiflora ‘byte’

*6

orquidofilia:

Nobile type Dendrobium hybrids.

By Porntip Wisetchonratar.